Worship through the ages: Vespers


  • Tue 21 August


  • 17.30



Worship has been offered daily in Saint Patrick’s for centuries. So come and join us this Heritage Week as we journey through 700 years of worship with 5 services charting the liturgical heritage of this ancient house of prayer.

VESPERS Tuesday 21 August at 5.30pm

To mark the establishment of the Choir School in 1432 our liturgical journey continues with the sung office of Vespers.

Traditionally celebrated around sunset, Vespers (often also simply called “Evening Prayer”) is one of the five “canonical hours.” The others are the Office of Readings (Scripture readings as well as selections from saints and spiritual writers), Morning Prayer (at dawn), Daytime Prayer and Night Prayer.

Vespers is considered a “hinge hour” in the daily cycle of the church’s prayer. It includes an Introductory Verse, a song, a recitation of two selections from the Book of Psalms and a “canticle” (song from scripture), all either sung or chanted, a scripture reading, a responsory (reflection on the theme of the Scriptural selections), the singing of the famous “Magnificat” (Mary’s song of praise from the Gospel of Luke), Intercessions, the Our Father, a Concluding Prayer and Dismissal.

Worship through the ages: Vespers


  • Tue 21 August


  • 17.30



Worship has been offered daily in Saint Patrick’s for centuries. So come and join us this Heritage Week as we journey through 700 years of worship with 5 services charting the liturgical heritage of this ancient house of prayer.

VESPERS Tuesday 21 August at 5.30pm

To mark the establishment of the Choir School in 1432 our liturgical journey continues with the sung office of Vespers.

Traditionally celebrated around sunset, Vespers (often also simply called “Evening Prayer”) is one of the five “canonical hours.” The others are the Office of Readings (Scripture readings as well as selections from saints and spiritual writers), Morning Prayer (at dawn), Daytime Prayer and Night Prayer.

Vespers is considered a “hinge hour” in the daily cycle of the church’s prayer. It includes an Introductory Verse, a song, a recitation of two selections from the Book of Psalms and a “canticle” (song from scripture), all either sung or chanted, a scripture reading, a responsory (reflection on the theme of the Scriptural selections), the singing of the famous “Magnificat” (Mary’s song of praise from the Gospel of Luke), Intercessions, the Our Father, a Concluding Prayer and Dismissal.